The Sean Effect

RSS

Basically, skateboarding is a business and the purpose of business is to make money. Many companies are ultimately run by “Dark Men.” People you don’t ever meet, people that inject money into a thing and expect to get more money. All they want is results. My bosses at Enjoi had bosses, and then they had bosses. Between the skateboarder and Dark Men, there’s a lot of people that are just trying to do their jobs…Guys in middle to upper management aren’t awake at night worrying about whether the skate company they work at is being “core” enough. And why would they?

- Capitalism explained through skateboarding, by Jerry Hsu. (via willystaley)

I believe that we form our own lives, that we create our own reality, and that everything works out for the best. I know I drive some people crazy with what seems to be ridiculous optimism, but it has always worked out for me.

- my favorite quote from Jim Henson.

Halloween or Williamsburg

Just wanted to make sure everyone saw this. Happy Halloween.

I took the picture on the left one year ago today, in the early morning hours after SuperStorm Sandy hit my hometown of Long Beach, NY. I took the picture on the right, in the same spot, this evening while running. 
Like I’ve said this whole year, I got extremely lucky with this storm. I lost my car and was displaced for 7 weeks. I’ve since moved 4 blocks west and 5 blocks closer to the ocean from where I was living when the storm hit. It could have been a thousand times worse. 
Yes, we got a brand new, beautiful boardwalk (all 2.2 miles of it now open, btw). But there are hundreds of people still not back in their homes. Keep them in mind as we commemorate a year since Sandy struck our shores.

I took the picture on the left one year ago today, in the early morning hours after SuperStorm Sandy hit my hometown of Long Beach, NY. I took the picture on the right, in the same spot, this evening while running.

Like I’ve said this whole year, I got extremely lucky with this storm. I lost my car and was displaced for 7 weeks. I’ve since moved 4 blocks west and 5 blocks closer to the ocean from where I was living when the storm hit. It could have been a thousand times worse.

Yes, we got a brand new, beautiful boardwalk (all 2.2 miles of it now open, btw). But there are hundreds of people still not back in their homes. Keep them in mind as we commemorate a year since Sandy struck our shores.

Hey!

So my good friend Chris and his brother are making a documentary about the Long Island Hardcore scene. Something in the Water is currently up for “Project of the Week" over at indiegogo, and if some of you could head over there and vote for them, it would be so sweet.

The LIHC scene, and the NYHC scene in general played a huge part of life during my high school years and still plays a major role in my life currently. Almost all of the friends I have today, I met through the LIHC / Punk scene. From what I’ve seen so far from this documentary, it’s going to be awesome.

Even if you’re not from Long Island, you know some of the bands that came out of the scene. If you want to go a little further and donate a few bones to get this project done, here’s the link (also, watch the trailer!). I thank you all kindly for your time.

Enjoy the weekend.

For the last three years, I told myself I’d run in the GLIRC Six Hour Run at Sunken Meadow State Park, on the north shore of Long Island. There were always conditions though: I had to lose a certain amount of weight (I’m a big dude, not exactly a runners body), and get my pace down to something that wouldn’t totally embarrass me. It didn’t happen the last two years, but this past Sunday, after an awesome couple of months of intense training and dropping pounds, I headed out to Sunken Meadow to run for six hours straight.
I had a goal of running 30 miles. The weeks leading up to the race, I was running a pretty consistent 9:10 pace for anything under 10 miles, which is basically the fastest I’ve been running in a solid 5 or 6 years. Keep in mind that I do 98% of my running in Long Beach, where the only elevation is the ramps going up to the boardwalk, maybe 12 feet up. I knew doing a six hour run on the hilly north shore was going to add a good amount of time to my overall pace, but I figured I would be able to keep it under 12 minutes throughout.
The course humbled me, big time. The course was half on trails and half on pavement. The off-road portion was sandy, full of gravel, and HILLY. The “rolling hills” that were mentioned in the race description turned out to be the first section of Cardiac Hill (the worst hill to run on Long Island), and some other stupid smaller ones. Nothing rolling about them. Trust.
Anytime I’m training for something longer a 15k, I break down the distance into shorter distances. For Sunday, with my goal being 30 miles, I broke it down into five 10ks, which I know is 31 miles, if I could do 30 maybe I could do 31?
I ran the first 10k in just over an hour, about a 10:04 pace. Miles 24-28.8 I did at a 9:37 pace.
In between miles 7-24 I went anywhere from 9:56 to 14:10 at mile 16.
It’s those in between miles that get ya. The excitement of doing something new wears off, and you start to realize that you have five more hours of running ahead of you. I don’t think there’s anything in this world that I want to do for five hours at a time. Do I really want to punish my body on steep hills and a rough terrain for the rest of my Sunday afternoon? The Jets are playing the Pats, and I still have two more hours until the final horn sounds. I trudged on.
The most common question I got when I told people I was going to do this, or afterwards when I told everyone what I did, was “Don’t you get bored?
I don’t understand this question. I don’t think it’s possible to get bored when you’re out running in one of the nicest state parks on Long Island. I saw dozens of different birds, saw some really interesting plant life, and met some really cool people. This race draws people from all over the country, and even one guy that I talked to for a good 2 miles was here visiting from Dublin, Ireland. It blows my mind when people say that running outside is boring. Even if you aren’t in a state park, running anywhere on the island or in NYC has to be more interesting than jogging on a treadmill with a ridiculous television in front of your face.
At the end of the six hours, I only was able to do 28.4 miles (my Nike running app was a little off in the woods). Am I disappointed that I didn’t hit 30? Kind of. 30 was the number I had set in my mind going into the training for this. But when I take into consideration that the course was way, way more difficult than I anticipated, and it was my first time doing any run over 4.5 hours, I can proudly say that I am officially an ultramarathoner. Hell, I even came in 38th place out 110 runners!
For the foreseeable future, I am going to concentrate on getting my half marathon time down. Looking ahead to next year, I’m absolutely going to plan on doing another ultramarathon. After reading Cary's account of the Canandaigua Lake 50 miler, I’m thinking that’s going to be the one. Also, major, major props to Cary for finishing that race with such an impressive time!

For the last three years, I told myself I’d run in the GLIRC Six Hour Run at Sunken Meadow State Park, on the north shore of Long Island. There were always conditions though: I had to lose a certain amount of weight (I’m a big dude, not exactly a runners body), and get my pace down to something that wouldn’t totally embarrass me. It didn’t happen the last two years, but this past Sunday, after an awesome couple of months of intense training and dropping pounds, I headed out to Sunken Meadow to run for six hours straight.

I had a goal of running 30 miles. The weeks leading up to the race, I was running a pretty consistent 9:10 pace for anything under 10 miles, which is basically the fastest I’ve been running in a solid 5 or 6 years. Keep in mind that I do 98% of my running in Long Beach, where the only elevation is the ramps going up to the boardwalk, maybe 12 feet up. I knew doing a six hour run on the hilly north shore was going to add a good amount of time to my overall pace, but I figured I would be able to keep it under 12 minutes throughout.

The course humbled me, big time. The course was half on trails and half on pavement. The off-road portion was sandy, full of gravel, and HILLY. The “rolling hills” that were mentioned in the race description turned out to be the first section of Cardiac Hill (the worst hill to run on Long Island), and some other stupid smaller ones. Nothing rolling about them. Trust.

Anytime I’m training for something longer a 15k, I break down the distance into shorter distances. For Sunday, with my goal being 30 miles, I broke it down into five 10ks, which I know is 31 miles, if I could do 30 maybe I could do 31?

I ran the first 10k in just over an hour, about a 10:04 pace. Miles 24-28.8 I did at a 9:37 pace.

In between miles 7-24 I went anywhere from 9:56 to 14:10 at mile 16.

It’s those in between miles that get ya. The excitement of doing something new wears off, and you start to realize that you have five more hours of running ahead of you. I don’t think there’s anything in this world that I want to do for five hours at a time. Do I really want to punish my body on steep hills and a rough terrain for the rest of my Sunday afternoon? The Jets are playing the Pats, and I still have two more hours until the final horn sounds. I trudged on.

The most common question I got when I told people I was going to do this, or afterwards when I told everyone what I did, was “Don’t you get bored?

I don’t understand this question. I don’t think it’s possible to get bored when you’re out running in one of the nicest state parks on Long Island. I saw dozens of different birds, saw some really interesting plant life, and met some really cool people. This race draws people from all over the country, and even one guy that I talked to for a good 2 miles was here visiting from Dublin, Ireland. It blows my mind when people say that running outside is boring. Even if you aren’t in a state park, running anywhere on the island or in NYC has to be more interesting than jogging on a treadmill with a ridiculous television in front of your face.

At the end of the six hours, I only was able to do 28.4 miles (my Nike running app was a little off in the woods). Am I disappointed that I didn’t hit 30? Kind of. 30 was the number I had set in my mind going into the training for this. But when I take into consideration that the course was way, way more difficult than I anticipated, and it was my first time doing any run over 4.5 hours, I can proudly say that I am officially an ultramarathoner. Hell, I even came in 38th place out 110 runners!

For the foreseeable future, I am going to concentrate on getting my half marathon time down. Looking ahead to next year, I’m absolutely going to plan on doing another ultramarathon. After reading Cary's account of the Canandaigua Lake 50 miler, I’m thinking that’s going to be the one. Also, major, major props to Cary for finishing that race with such an impressive time!

This is what you shall do; Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.

- Walt Whitman, Long Island native, died on this day in 1892.

Happy St. Patricks Day

Daily exercise will keep you away from all diseases.

-

-Fauja Singh


101-Year-Old Marathoner to Retire

I have always supported a reunion of any kind including all of us. Honestly, the fans still love us and our show so much … they deserve it!

- Dennis Haskins, aka Mr. Belding